Arms & Hands Maneuvers during Sled Training

– By Mack Pijewski


If you are looking for intense athletic training, then one of the most exclusive and advantageous equipment is the sled! Sled Training is easy and doesn’t require any complicated forms. When you are using the sled, the risk of injury is very little. Sled training is very necessary for sturdy athletes who cannot afford any inflexibility. 

Depending upon your ultimate goals, sled training could result productive in intensifying strength, power, speed, and even conditioning. Not everything at the same instant, but it can be a dynamic tool to address all of these.

Another noticeable advantage of sled training is the number of variables or options that come with it. For instance, you are flexible in adjusting speed, load, position, distance, duration, etc. Based on one’s objectives, there could hundreds of outputs of the sled work. However, one question that I been mostly asked by the athletes is that what should be my arms and hands maneuvers during the sled training? More precisely, where should my arms and hands be while I push the sled?

Well, most common exercises like squats, pushups, pull-ups, dead-lifts, etc. follow some SOP(s) (Standards of Procedure), however, up till now, I haven’t come across any standard of best practice of performing the sled training. Keeping in view, I have illustrated how someone should set-up with the sled, depending upon what he wants to get out of it.

STRAIGHTEN YOUR ARMS

Let’s start with the extended-arm position. This type of arrangement allows one to intensify acceleration angles, open up his pace, and maximize his strength by working at a much higher speed. However, this arrangement restricts the amount of load an athlete can hilt. Not the greatest of an output an athlete can expect from this setup is the only downside here. You cannot move max weight in this position.

The “straighten your arms” applies to the kind of programming that demand moderate to low weight on the sled. Conversely, the speed work, plyos, power work, and conditioning methods could be efficiently and effectively done from this setup; the arms-extended Sled Push.

ARMS BENT

Contrary to that, if you are willing to go hard on the training, then the arms bent position is an outstanding position for pushing maximal weight on the sled. This position creates a more solid lever system enabling the trainee to follow more in-strength programming.

 This set-up will retard your speed for the reason that the crowding of the torso and load being so near to the hips do not allow the trainee to reach a stride length that would transmit over firmly into speed.

Because of increased loading, the strength-gaining activities is going to be significantly provoking, thus will assist in getting stronger and more stable in a unilateral setting.

FEW TIPS FOR DOING SLED TRAINING!

The answer to the above-mentioned question regarding the position of arms or hands during the training is BOTH! Both arms/hands positions are important. Try to figure out what you want to get out of the sled training and that’s it, use your head and plan accordingly.

I have explained some of the useful plus beneficial ways to use the sled and what arm/hands position would be a good choice for each.

1. HEAVY SLED PUSH

You have to position your arms in bend form for this one. The exercise consists of using a heavy sled for 5-10 steps per leg. This exercise is intense and is great for strengthening legs and hamstrings. This exercise also comes with a squat variant as well. We can work this in as a Lunge or Split Squat. This works significantly well! The low impact boasts productive and fast results.

2. SLED THROWS

Arms extended

If you want to take the game of the medicine ball throws up then just grab a sled and throw it instead. This is a great power package that undertakes full body-fatigue. Power is the phenomenon that lies between extremes (max) of speed and strength on the force-deformation curve, you can carry this over into your arm position comfortably here. Here’s an interesting tip, you can start with your arms bent for max tension, later on, extend your arms at max speed.

3. SLED SPRINT

Arms Extended here too

The Sled Sprint is a traditional exercise that enables the athletes to lean, shred or burn some turf! An athlete can go out with this inertia or variation using a much lighter load. Your focus should be on bringing-up lean, knee drive and triple extension on the focused leg, usually, the back one. Sled sprint is intended to move fast and smooth.

4. SLED INTERVALS

Arms Extended

A SLED is the only equipment in the gym that can whip you into great shape! What I suggest for the interval setup for conditioning is a 15-yard working set followed by 50 seconds of rest, repeated 10-20 times based on your capability. It’s a great generation conditioning methodology, however, there are many options to be sports explicit with flexibility on the sled. Like I said earlier, be specific about what your needs are and demands are based on your sport, then build those energy systems whichever goes with it.

These are just the temporary guidelines that I have taken out from a few pieces of research. Try them out and let me know how it goes! 

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